Sean Maguire

Sean Maguire

London, England

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Menlo Park, California

Mohamad Ali

Mohamad Ali

Boston, Massachusetts

Thao Nguyen

Thao Nguyen

San Francsico, California

Rasimul Rasim

Rasimul Rasim

Boston, Massachusetts

Pham Thi Hau

Pham Thi Hau

Hanoi, Vietnam

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

Kolda, Senegal

Divya Singh

Divya Singh

Queens, New York

Alejandra Schrader

Alejandra Schrader

Los Angeles, CA

Emily Robinson

Emily Robinson

New York, New York

What's the 100%?

The 100% is Oxfam's vision of people united against the injustice of poverty—standing together, taking responsibility, holding the powerful accountable, and owning our roles in ending poverty. We believe in:

Inclusiveness. We invite everyone to be part of the solution.

Accountability. We hold ourselves accountable for our actions, and others for theirs.

Empowerment. We are all capable of making change.

We're fighting for a future where 100% of humanity has the same basic rights. Will you join us?

About Oxfam ▶︎
Sean Maguire

Sean Maguire

London, England

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Menlo Park, California

Mohamad Ali

Mohamad Ali

Boston, Massachusetts

Thao Nguyen

Thao Nguyen

San Francsico, California

Rasimul Rasim

Rasimul Rasim

Boston, Massachusetts

Pham Thi Hau

Pham Thi Hau

Hanoi, Vietnam

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

Kolda, Senegal

Divya Singh

Divya Singh

Queens, New York

Alejandra Schrader

Alejandra Schrader

Los Angeles, CA

Emily Robinson

Emily Robinson

New York, New York

Sean Maguire

Sean Maguire

London, England

Why I'm 100%:

I believe we are all brothers and sisters. So when I saw refugees risking their lives, being held in camps, living in tents, I thought: What if that were us, me and my wife, our children?

It's a question we should all ask ourselves. Just because a person is of a different nationality, has different political views and faces different circumstances, do they deserve to be treated as less?

These are absolutely desperate people, but they're 100% human. And we must do the human thing and help. We must participate in recognizing 100% of humanity.

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Sara Gaviser Leslie

Menlo Park, California

Why I'm 100%:

To be 100% is to recognize that we're all in this together and we all have a role to play in shaping a fairer future.

I believe it is our job to "tikkun olam"—or repair the world.

To do that, those of us who have the resources must advocate for those who do not. Volunteer, donate, educate, protest, petition. Every action makes a difference.

By fighting for each other, we can shape a world in which luck does not determine a person’s position in life or limit their full humanity.

Mohamad Ali

Mohamad Ali

Boston, Massachusetts

Why I'm 100%:

I want 100% of the people on our planet to be out of poverty, because when 100% of us can be contributing to the betterment of our society we're all better off.

I grew up poor. I know what it is like. I saw the opportunities of the world, and when I thought they were beyond my reach, people helped me. Because of that, I am now in a place where I can help others.

I know that people can be lifted out of poverty to contribute in meaningful ways to this world. If each one of us contribute a small amount, we can make a big difference. We've already made tremendous progress.We just need to keep going.

Thao Nguyen

Thao Nguyen

San Francsico, California

Why I'm 100%:

I get so inspired by what people can do to help each other. I am also floored by what people can do to each other, and how helpless I can feel to challenge the roots of inequality and change the effects of poverty. I don't ever want to ignore the truth because I can afford to. I know we all get overwhelmed, and I'm so grateful there are beacons like Oxfam to help keep us driven and engaged. If enough of us are committed, we can pick up each other's slack and keep moving toward grace.

I'm 100 because I need you to be 100 to keep me 100.

Rasimul Rasim

Rasimul Rasim

Boston, Massachusetts

Why I'm 100%:

I come from a small community in one of the poorest parts of the world, where I lived with my family in a one-bedroom house made of tin. I have seen the inability of the poor to ask for the most basic human rights, and I am passionate about changing that.

I believe in a universal set of rights that 100% of humanity should enjoy: the right to food and clean water, the ability to earn a living, the opportunity to make decisions that affect our lives. So I volunteer, donate, advocate and listen. I do this because I have seen positive change, and I want to be part of it.

Pham Thi Hau

Pham Thi Hau

Hanoi, Vietnam

Why I'm 100%:

Where I live in Vietnam, gender inequality has long held women back. I experienced many years of poverty and domestic violence. I faced the challenges of widowhood and have struggled to provide for my daughter.

Sadly, my experience is not unique, especially among us street vendors. These women know little about their rights as workers, city ways, and that violence against them is unacceptable. They are unaware of how to use social services or banks, how to manage pressure from the police, or how to take care of their health.

That is why we have formed self-help groups. I lead one of them, helping my fellow migrant workers understand their rights, social and health benefits, and sharing information that will help them improve their lives and the lives of others. We are joining the 100%: raising awareness and turning it into action.

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

El Hadj Ndiobo Mballo

Kolda, Senegal

Why I'm 100%:

In Kolda, where rural poverty is about 56%, Oxfam and my organization, 7a, work with the most vulnerable populations, especially women.

Here, women face discrimination in government, limited access to property, the persistence of practices such as female genital mutilation and forced marriages. Although they are the main producers of rice and vegetables, women struggle to obtain land. They do not have a presence in decision-making bodies. They have not been empowered to create change.

Today we are creating citizens' juries: 24 equal men and women ensuring elected officials do not discriminate, and that women have a voice in public policy. Together, we are fighting for justice for 100% of Senegalese people.

Divya Singh

Divya Singh

Queens, New York

Why I'm 100%:

When I was a child, my family moved from Bhopal, India, to Queens, New York. That experience opened my eyes to the discrepancy between the extreme poverty I observed in India and the wealth I saw in the US.

It also influenced my decision to devote my life to medicine and providing care in the developing world. I resigned from private practice to join Orthopaedics Overseas, an organization focused on improving orthopedic care in under-resourced settings by educating local healthcare providers.

I'm a strong believer in paying it forward and creating opportunities for others. The educational support I received has made all the difference in my life, and now I'm making a difference in other people's lives as part of the 100%.

Alejandra Schrader

Alejandra Schrader

Los Angeles, CA

Why I'm 100%:

As a chef, it's my mission to help end world hunger and to develop better, more sustainable farming and food systems in underprivileged communities.

Growing up in Venezuela, I witnessed how difficult it is for some to get access to nutritious foods. I know firsthand the importance of good nutrition for cognitive development and overall health. Today, it's not a question about having enough food for a growing global population, it's about how food is grown and making sure everyone has the means to provide for themselves and their loved ones.

Through our collective actions as the 100%—changing how we purchase, cook, and eat food—we can make sure no one goes hungry.

Emily Robinson

Emily Robinson

New York, New York

Why I'm 100%:

Growing up in the Internet generation, I've always enjoyed a sense of interconnectedness with the global community. We have so much in common. But what we need more of is empathy.

To be 100%, we must be proactive citizens of the world. That means we must share responsibility for global issues. We must try to understand the experiences of others: be open to their feelings, sympathetic to their challenges, and—most of all—willing to help.

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